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Accueil > À noter > Séminaires > Monday 3 September 2018. Ingvars BIRZNIEKS (Western Sydney Univ., Australia). At 2PM, Salle des thèses (A1.04), Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’Sensing friction for motor control and perception’.

Monday 3 September 2018. Ingvars BIRZNIEKS (Western Sydney Univ., Australia). At 2PM, Salle des thèses (A1.04), Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Campus de Luminy (Marseille). ’Sensing friction for motor control and perception’.

Invité par Michael WIERTLEWSKI

Mise à jour : 29 août

The ability of the human hand to manipulate objects and tools is underpinned by a combination of sophisticated tactile sensing and processing mechanisms, clever sensorimotor transformations, and anticipatory strategies. The dexterity of the human hand in object manipulation is unparalleled in the natural world and still remains unmatched by the most advanced artificial devices. The ability of humans to perform delicate tasks such as picking a raspberry without crushing it or making well-controlled yet powerful actions like operating power tools, relies on the universal control principle that the grip force we use to hold an object must be scaled by friction in proportion to the load forces pulling the object out of our grip. Tactile receptors in the fingers and hand play a critical role in providing relevant information required for implementation of such control. Yet how this is achieved remains largely unknown.
My research aims to reveal and explain sensory processes, especially those involved in friction sensing, at the level of neuronal code, biomechanics, and behaviour. During my talk I will scrutinise existing experimental evidence about how friction related adjustments in the fingertip forces are achieved during object manipulation in humans. Finally I will put forward and discuss a roadmap for future research in the field.